Ruby Education

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Ruby Education

Just like sapphires rubies are highly used in fine jewelry. Can be mounted on it’s own or complimented by diamonds ruby has a captivating red color. Like sapphires, rubies are also members of the corundum mineral species. Rubies receive their red color from high levels of the trace element chromium.

Ruby Color
The categorization of red gemstones, and thus rubies, can include shades of pink in some Asian markets. In European and North American markets, red and pink corundum is often delegated into two separate color categories. Pink corundum would fall under the pink sapphire category and red corundum, with medium to very dark red tones, would be categorized as ruby.

Objective color determination has been difficult to achieve for rubies. Ancient trade terms such as “pigeon’s blood,” “pomegranate,” “saffron,” and “China rose” have long been used to describe the color of a ruby. However, these terms are not universally recognized and an objective system for evaluating rubies did not exist until recently. Today, gemologists assess a ruby’s color based upon the three factors of hue, tone, and saturation.

Ruby Clarity
An untreated ruby is a natural ruby (created by natural processes) that has not been subject to any enhancement treatments, including heating and chemical processes.

Rubies are most often treated to enhance their color and clarity to improve their saleability. New treatments are constantly being developed to enhance low-grade rubies, and it is important for retailers and gem laboratories to keep up and accurately test for new enhancements. Gemologists can often decipher if a stone has been treated, but lab testing can be used for complete accuracy.

Ruby Cut
Like sapphires rubies don’t go by set rules of cutting. For the most part cutters try to maintain as much carat weight as possible while cutting a gemstone to it’s perfect proportions.


Ruby Treatments

An untreated ruby is a natural ruby (created by natural processes) that has not been subject to any enhancement treatments, including heating and chemical processes.

Rubies are most often treated to enhance their color and clarity to improve their saleability. New treatments are constantly being developed to enhance low-grade rubies, and it is important for retailers and gem laboratories to keep up and accurately test for new enhancements. Gemologists can often decipher if a stone has been treated, but lab testing can be used for complete accuracy.

Ruby Jewelry Care

Caring for your jewelry will not only add to the brilliance of gemstones and the luster of platinum, or gold, but it will also extend the life of your jewelry for generations to come.

To keep your rubies sparkling, clean them when dust and fingerprints dim their brilliance. The best way to clean fine jewelry is in a bowl of warm water with a few drops of ordinary dish detergent. Using an old toothbrush or other soft brush, scrub gently behind the stone where dust and soap can collect. Then just rinse and pat dry with a soft cloth.

 
     



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